Hay Riverites nab two medals from skills competition

 

photo courtesy of Dave Brosha Photography (he gave Skills Canada NWT permission to send us photos)  Hay River’s Dalton Atwell, pictured at the Territorial Skills Competition in Yellowknife, participated in the Auto Service event and won a silver medal.

Dave Brosha Photography photo
Hay River’s Dalton Atwell, pictured at the Territorial Skills Competition in Yellowknife, participated in the Auto Service event and won a silver medal.

Two out of the three Hay River participants at the 15th annual Territorial Skills Competition have returned with medals.

Dalton Atwell, Zackary Bonnetrouge and Colton Glaicar were in Yellowknife on April 16 to take part in the event, which featured 66 registered competitors and student demonstrators from across the NWT competing in 17 different events.

The events ranged from baking to electrical wiring to hairstyling.

Atwell and Glaicar both competed in the auto service event, with Atwell winning a silver medal.

We had to do various contests related to the automotive trade, from diagnosing engine problems to measuring the internal components of a motor,” the medal winner said.

Atwell, who started training at Andy’s Auto Service in Hay River, is currently working in the service department at the Kingland Ford dealership.

I think my favorite part of the competition involved the fabrication, which required a lot of concentration and skill,” he said.

Glaicar said it was a great experience and an awesome challenge.

They throw a lot at you in a short amount of time and I would definitely recommend it to anyone who is interested,” he said.

Bonnetrouge, who took part in the welding event, also won a silver medal.

I practised at the Diamond Jenness Secondary School shop and did a bit of welding with Kingland Freightliner, where I currently work since they give me opportunities to weld,” he said.

The Territorial Skills Competition, which was started in 1999 by Skills Canada NWT, promotes careers in skilled trades and technologies to northern youth.

In the coming decades, employers in the NWT will find it difficult to hire and keep skilled workers,” according to the website of Skills Canada NWT. “At the same time, northern youth have limited opportunities to explore different career options while still in school.”

— Myles Dolphin