Businesses reach out to high school students

 

Myles Dolphin/NNSL photo Northwest Territories Power Corporation power line technician Deaon Hope, left, demonstrates hot sticking to DJSS student Paige Kruger.

Myles Dolphin/NNSL photo
Northwest Territories Power Corporation power line technician Deaon Hope, left, demonstrates hot sticking to DJSS student Paige Kruger.

Representatives from a variety of Hay River and territorial businesses were on hand at Diamond Jenness Secondary School for its Occupations and Trades Fair on May 1.

The companies and organizations included Poison Graphics, NWT Centennial Library, Avalon Rare Metals, Kingland Ford, Northwest Territories Power Corporation (NTPC), and Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

The fair is a way for high school students to interact with professionals and get more insight into what they do.

Derek Mundy, manager at Poison Graphics, said a lot of students showed an interest in the company’s work, which includes creating graphics, advertising and painting.

Some people still think we paint cars,” he said, holding up a picture of a bright pink vehicle bearing the company’s logo, which can often be seen around Hay River. “It’s actually wrapped in a sticker. If you’re interested in graphic design and software, you can learn the basics and the terminology by working for us, which would prepare you well for any course you would want to take related to that.”

Mundy, who began working at Poison Graphics when he was a teenager, said he spent hundreds of hours after school tinkering with the software and hardware, until he learned how it operated.

Computers and math are really important in this field,” he noted.

Sharmayne Horton, a human resources officer for NTPC, said she was encouraging students to consider the corporation’s apprenticeship program and to think about how power gets to their homes.

NTPC power line technician Deaon Hope, who demonstrated how to use certain pieces of equipment for curious students, said there is a serious shortage of workers in his field across North America.

Any lineman not working it’s because they don’t want to,” Hope said. “There will always be a need for the trades.”

Diamond Jenness student Kara Schaefer, who has an interest in medicine, said she enjoyed speaking to a representative of the Correctional Service of Canada.

He was really informative and had a lot to share about how to start off and become a corrections officer,” said Schaefer, who is in Grade 9.

— Myles Dolphin