Hay River moviemaker comes home

 

Photo courtesy of Kelvin Redvers - Kelvin Redvers won the 2013 Jack Webster Award for best feature story in the television category for 'A Home for Edgar' on CTV B.C.'s 'First Story' program. The prestigious journalism accolade is awarded by the Jack Webster Foundation, which seeks to promote excellence in journalism in British Columbia.

Photo courtesy of Kelvin Redvers – Kelvin Redvers won the 2013 Jack Webster Award for best feature story in the television category for ‘A Home for Edgar’ on CTV B.C.’s ‘First Story’ program. The prestigious journalism accolade is awarded by the Jack Webster Foundation, which seeks to promote excellence in journalism in British Columbia.

For the first time in a long time, Kelvin Redvers will be in his hometown of Hay River for more than a day or two, and plans to make the most of it by showing the work he has done since he left for British Columbia and a career in film and television.

One of my favourite nights was at the beginning of Grade 12 when I showed a bunch of movies I had made in Hay River,” Redvers told The Hub. “The whole reason for making films is hoping someone will watch them. I grew up in Hay River, and I hope people will come out and there will be a good audience.”

Redvers will present a series of short films and clips from his work in television at NWT Centennial Library on Dec. 13 at 7 p.m., including comedies he made soon after moving to university, at least one documentary and one narrative short, along with his award-winning short film ‘The Dancing Cop’. Parts of ‘Rattlesnake’, Redvers’ current project, will also be shown.

Redvers recently turned to crowd-funding as a method to raise enough money to make ‘Rattlesnake’ and, in large part due to Hay River’s generosity he said, the campaign was a success.

The town of Hay River very directly helped make this film,” he said. “It’s nowhere near completed, but I wanted to show some of what I have so far as a thank-you to people who donated money to make it happen.”

Christine Gyapay, the head librarian at NWT Centennial Library, said she is looking forward to the event on Dec. 13. The library will be open only for the screening, which will take place in the main room of the building.

It’s always wonderful to have people contacting the library with events like this,” she said, adding she feels the library functions as a community centre for the arts, and film screenings are a perfect fit.

I know Kelvin hasn’t shown his work here in quite a while, so I hope people come out for it,” she said. “It’s going to be a wonderful evening.”

Apart from giving back what he can to the community that helped him develop his career and his current project, Redvers hopes he might be able to encourage any emerging filmmakers in Hay River to make a go of it while he is here. He noted that, when things got tough when he was in high school, he always felt better with a camera in his hand.

Any time someone picks up a camera or a brush, that’s a great thing,” Redvers said. “It’s so much easier to get into (film) now with all the technology out there. Hopefully if they see someone who has managed to make a career of it, they might be encouraged to keep at it.”

-Sarah Ladik