Education council wins national honour

photo courtesy of South Slave Divisional Education Council The South Slave Divisional Education Council (SSDEC) was presented with the Indigenous Organization Award from Indspire on Nov. 4 in Toronto. On hand from the South Slave for the award ceremony were, left to right, Shirley Lamalice, Doris Camsell, Nathalie Diaz, Brandie Miersch, Ann Pischinger, Diane Tourangeau, Kaysea Fountain, Brent Kaulback, Angie Fabien and superintendent Curtis Brown.

photo courtesy of South Slave Divisional Education Council
The South Slave Divisional Education Council (SSDEC) was presented with the Indigenous Organization Award from Indspire on Nov. 4 in Toronto. On hand from the South Slave for the award ceremony were, left to right, Shirley Lamalice, Doris Camsell, Nathalie Diaz, Brandie Miersch, Ann Pischinger, Diane Tourangeau, Kaysea Fountain, Brent Kaulback, Angie Fabien and superintendent Curtis Brown.

The South Slave Divisional Education Council has been honoured with one of the most prestigious awards an education body in Canada can win – the Indigenous Organization Award presented by Indspire, the largest funder of indigenous education aside from the federal government.
A group of South Slave delegates were on hand during the Nov. 4 award ceremony in Toronto, including aboriginal language instructors and teachers attending an Indspire conference, regional staff presenting workshops and a council representative invited to receive the award.
“We are immensely proud of the work that has been done in the South Slave by our staff, DEAs, council, students, parents and other community partners,” said superintendent Curtis Brown. “Our collective focus on continuous improvement and innovation has had an impressive impact on student achievement in all our South Slave communities.”

The 2016 Guiding the Journey: Indigenous Educator Awards recognize the achievements of outstanding educators of indigenous students.

Winners are chosen based on innovative teaching practices, cultural teachings in the curriculum, and how they help indigenous students reach their full potential.

“These educators are exemplary in their innovation and dedication to helping First Nation, Inuit, and Metis children and youth succeed,” said Roberta Jamieson, president and CEO of Indspire. “They are creating lasting change in the communities they serve and enriching the field of indigenous education through their contributions.”

Nine individual educators and the SSDEC were honoured with awards.

There was one other winner from the NWT. Lois Philipp, the principal of Deh Gah School in Fort Providence, won the leadership award.

The education council, along with its educators, staff, students and partners in education, have been recognized with more than 70 local, territorial and national awards since the Leadership for Literacy initiative began in 2007.

The Guiding the Journey ceremony was part of Indspire’s annual National Gathering for Indigenous Education, a conference that took place from Nov. 4 to 5 in Toronto.

The gathering attracted more than 800 people from across the country.

Indspire is an indigenous-led registered charity that invests in the education of indigenous people for the long-term benefit of these individuals, their families and communities, and Canada.

–Paul Bickford